How has your Choosing Excellence™ training been helpful to you and your school? Dr. Robert Butz

 

All of the educators were asked the same five questions. Follow-up questions and clarifications are specific to the individual and their role.

1. What were some of the factors that influenced your decision to become an educator?
2. Who was the most influential teacher (coach) in your life?
3. What are few of your most important learnings since becoming a teacher? Coach? AP? Principal? Superintendent?
4. How has what you learned through Choosing Excellence™ (CT/QP/Baldrige/Quality Tools) helped you in your position(s)?
5. What advice would you give to a first year person in your position?

What is your most significant learning as an educator? Dr. Robert Butz

 

All of the educators were asked the same five questions. Follow-up questions and clarifications are specific to the individual and their role.

1. What were some of the factors that influenced your decision to become an educator?
2. Who was the most influential teacher (coach) in your life?
3. What are few of your most important learnings since becoming a teacher? Coach? AP? Principal? Superintendent?
4. How has what you learned through Choosing Excellence™ (CT/R/Baldrige/Quality Tools) helped you in your position(s)?
5. What advice would you give to a first year person in your position?

What advice would you give to a first year principal and/or teacher? Dr. Robert Butz

 

All of the educators were asked the same five questions. Follow-up questions and clarifications are specific to the individual and their role.

1. What were some of the factors that influenced your decision to become an educator?
2. Who was the most influential teacher (coach) in your life?
3. What are few of your most important learnings since becoming a teacher? Coach? AP? Principal? Superintendent?
4. How has what you learned through Choosing Excellence™ (CT/R/Baldrige/Quality Tools) helped you in your position(s)?
5. What advice would you give to a first year person in your position?

What factors influenced your decision to become an educator? Dr. Robert Butz

All of the educators were asked the same five questions. Follow-up questions and clarifications are specific to the individual and their role.

1. What were some of the factors that influenced your decision to become an educator?
2. Who was the most influential teacher (coach) in your life?
3. What are few of your most important learnings since becoming a teacher? Coach? AP? Principal? Superintendent?
4. How has what you learned through Choosing Excellence™ (CT/R/Baldrige/Quality Tools) helped you in your position(s)?
5. What advice would you give to a first year person in your position?

Hypocrisy in how we treat some students?

This is primarily directed to educators and parents.

Have you have ever made a diet or exercise plan?

Did you ever “break your plan” after 2, 3, 5 days?

Does that mean you weren’t sincere when you said it was important to exercise more or lose weight?

When I ask the question in my Choosing ExcellenceTM workshops, everyone says they were sincere, but it was difficult.

I agree!

If a student makes a plan for change and then has problems after 2 or 3 days, most educators say, “the student wasn’t serious about changing.” Or “They were just telling me what I wanted to hear.”

If an adult fails after a few days with a diet or exercise plan, does it mean that it wasn’t or isn’t a good idea?  Does it mean they weren’t serious?  Does it mean they were telling themselves what they wanted to hear?

In most cases the answer is “No.”  The plan began with sincerity and good intention.  Some changes are difficult.

My question is, if adults have difficulty changing, why shouldn’t a 5 year-old, 10 year-old, or 15 year old?

Ask one or several of the following questions.

  • Was the plan a good idea?
  • Is it still important to you improve ________?
  • Do you want to make any changes to the plan?
  • When will you recommit to the plan?

Deming’s Quality Principles

W. Edwards Deming  (1900-1993)

In 1947, Deming was involved in early planning for the 1951 Japanese Census. Dr. Deming was invited by General Douglas MacArthur (who grew so frustrated at being unable to complete so much as a phone call without the line going dead due to Japan’s shattered post-war economy) to be part of the rebuilding team in Japan.   While in Japan, people quickly realized his expertise in quality control techniques. Working with companies like Toyota, Sony and many others, he helped Japan dominate the auto and electronics industries within 5 years.

After his success in Japan, Ford, Xerox and Proctor & Gamble started using Deming’s methods. Ford and Xerox credit Dr. Deming with saving their companies from extinction.

Quality Principle: Quality is never the problem; rather it is the solution to the problem.

Perversity Principle: Any attempt to increase productivity and cut costs by imposing quantitative constraints on a system results only in increased costs elsewhere in the system.

Seems a shame that so many have abandoned Deming’s Management Theories!  I’d like our legislators and leaders to pay attention to his theories and results.  We are doing the opposite in many cases.

Learners Instead of Students

How, if in any way, would your classroom, school and/or district be different if the word “students” were replaced with the word “learners“?

In The School for Quality Learning: Managing the School and Classroom the Deming Way (1993), Crawford, Bodine and Hoglund consistently referred to the learners in the school.  From a Choice Theory® perceptions point of view, it seems that the word would help more adults and children focus more on the purpose of school being learning and less on grades and credits.  I started using learners a little more in the fall, but plan to commit to regular use in 2016!

Your thoughts and comments are welcomed!

Correction! Go DELIBERATELY and INTENTIONALLY to Go Fast

Go SLOW to Go Fast is a commonly stated approach to large and small implementation and change processes.  While the concept seems to make sense to many people, often it is used as an excuse to go so slowly that there is no real impact on the system.  It is the design and implementation of processes that determines the speed and effectiveness of change.

Blending the Glasser/Baldrige Models with the PDSA process helps to prepare for intentional, deliberate planning and implementation.

PDSA

Questioning.PDSA


 

 

 

Cooperation and Learning: A Cooperative Class Meeting™

Last Friday we had the pleasure of leading a Cooperative Class Meeting™ on Cooperation and Learning with 3rd graders at Rayma C. Page Elementary. The students worked in groups of 3 or 4 to answer the 4 questions. It was exciting to watch the students thinking, discussing and sharing their answers.

The Challenge was: Make a list of ways that cooperation can help you and your class meet your learning goals?

The groups identified 5 or 6 things that would help them learn and reach their goals and we wrote them down and projected with the document camera. The list will be hung by the data wall to remind the students of the positive things they can do to help themselves and others learn

Cooperation and Learning

The teacher, Ms. Ray wrote:

I want to thank you so much for taking the time to prepare a Class Meeting for my class.  The students and I both learned a lot.  We added a few things to our “How does cooperating help us learn?” chart and I made it into a poster to discuss when the students return tomorrow.

Using the Questioning Process at Home – Part 4 – Goals/Action Steps

These are questions that I wrote for a colleague who was dealing with a specific member of her family, but I believe they are helpful as a reference point for any situation.  Please read s previous Using the Questions with Family Members for a more detailed explanation…

Life in general…(SMART Goals and Plans)

  • Do you have any goals?
  • If not, does not having goals help you move towards happiness?
  • Do you have action steps that will really help you accomplish your goal(s)?
  • How do you know if you are making progress?
  • S = Specific
    M = Measurable
    A = Aligned with Quality World Picture (What you want)
    R = Results Oriented (Success)
    T = Time-Bound and Transferable (Would it work at home and at school?)
  • Example:   By the end of the week I will spend at least three, 15 minute sessions of quality (fun) time with each of my children.  I will record each fun event in a notebook and review it on Sunday.
  • Alternate Way:  Involve the children and let them graph or record the times….

Obviously, if you are asking a family member these questions, you will want to make the questions sound like you – so work them into your own language.  Remember that you are just the questioner; it is not as effective if you just tell the person what you think.