Making Connections: Choosing Excellence™, The Glasser Quality School and Baldridge Quality Models

Each month I will be writing about one of Deming’s Management Points, Diseases or Obstacles and relate it to Choosing Excellence™. Each article will relate to Glasser Quality Schools, the Baldrige/Sterling Quality Model, Quality Tools and classroom applications of The Three Es (Environment, Expectations and Evaluation). References will also be made to data relating to Closing the Achievement Gap, Teacher Effectiveness and Training information.


Point 1: Create a Constancy of Purpose

According to Deming, management faces two sets of problems, those of today and those of tomorrow. Today’s problems in education tend to be viewed by policymakers in terms of disciplining students to work in the existing system and raising achievement test scores. Schools tend to dwell on such matters without attending adequately to the students future needs.


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Point 2: Adopt the New Philosophy

With the passing of time, using the word “new” to address concepts taught over 40 years ago seems out-of-date. Yet, for many educators this is new information. It is not what they have experienced or been taught. Choosing Excellence™, the blending of the Glasser Quality School and Baldrige Quality Models, along with the use of Quality Tools, practices and strategies, is totally consistent with Dr. Deming’s theories.


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Point 3: Cease Dependence on Mass Inspection

According to Deming, inspection of a finished product as it comes off the line, or at key points during production, is too late, ineffective, and unnecessarily expensive. With this type of inspection, the company is paying workers to make defective parts and then to correct the defects. The consumer pays for the duplication of work…


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Hattie Research - Student Achievement

John Hattie, Professor of Education at Auckland University, New Zealand, has spent years investigating factors that influence student achievement. His book, Visible Learning (2009) presents a synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses, including over 50,000 separate studies, related to student achievement. Hattie ranks 138 effects on student learning, ranging from self-reported grades/expectations as the number one positive influence…

Self-reported Grades/Expectations (Ranking of #1, Effect Size of 1.44)

Dr. Glasser was a strong advocate for teaching students to evaluate their own work (The Quality School: Managing Students Without Coercion 1990). Depending on the assignment, it could be a simple rating of quality, effort or both (1 to 5, or traditional grades of A – F).

This is the first of a series of posts describing how Choosing Excellence™ (The blending of the Glasser Quality School and Baldrige Quality Models) is impacting student achievement and closing the achievement gap.


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Setting Class SMART Goals

Involving the whole class in discussing and evaluating goal setting can be eye opening for some teachers. While it is crucial to include students in the process, the key words are “to include”. Teachers are not left out of the process. This short article demonstrates what can happen, and how to correct it, when students set low goals for themselves.


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Using Questions for Critical Thinking

Critical thinking is important because it enables one to analyze, evaluate, explain, and restructure our thinking, thereby decreasing the risk of adopting, acting on, or thinking with, a false belief. 

The key to critical thinking in the classroom is knowing what questions to ask and how to ask them…


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Glasser Quality Schools Leads to Choosing Excellence

Tropic Isles Elementary School, in North Fort Myers, Florida began their quality journey over thirteen (13) years ago. Along the way, the faculty and staff declared as a Glasser Quality School and received a Governor’s Sterling Award for state-wide role-model status. This article reviews the blended quality model (Glasser-Baldrige) implemented by the school and the increase in student achievement that resulted from its use.


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Deming's Theory of Management

Deming’s theory of management rests on 14 basic points he developed while working for Japanese companies in the early 1950s. Although these 14 tenets were derived from the business world, they have direct applicability to the field of education. As more and more school districts are introduced to Glasser’s “Quality Education Program” it is important that Deming’s 14 points be translated into educational terms so that teachers and administrators can better assimilate the concepts.


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External Standards vs. External Control

The value of a quality teacher cannot be overstated. Educators who are able to model continuous improvement principles, bring them to the classroom, and facilitate their use by students will enable those students to think critically, plan for improvement, and take control of their own learning. That is success, by any measure.


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EDUCATION
NEAF Customer Feedback

Lee County, FL, was one of seven districts across the nation to receive a Closing the Gaps initiative grant from the National Education Association Foundation.  This grant has provided $250,000 annually for the past five years to provide support to Lee County’s project,Closing the Gaps through Choosing ExcellenceAs the grant period comes to an end, participating schools have shown an overall increase in learning and a decrease in achievement gaps as compared to other District schools.

The initiative had five major objectives, which if met, would contribute to increased student achievement across all student subgroups.  This article will address the first objective relating to teacher training.

NEAF Grant Objectives 

  1. All teachers in project schools will earn a rating of Effective or Highly Effective on applicable indicators of the Teacher Evaluation tool within the 5-year project period.

The excerpt below examines the satisfaction with the professional development provided by the grant and the impact on teacher effectiveness.


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NEAF Final Report

Lee County, FL, was one of seven districts across the nation to receive a Closing the Gaps initiative grant from the National Education Association Foundation.  This grant has provided $250,000 annually for the past five years to provide support to Lee County’s project,Closing the Gaps through Choosing ExcellenceAs the grant period comes to an end, participating schools have shown an overall increase in learning and a decrease in achievement gaps as compared to other District schools.

The initiative had five major objectives, which if met, would contribute to increased student achievement across all student subgroups.  This article will address the first objective relating to teacher training.

NEAF Grant Objectives 

  1. All teachers in project schools will earn a rating of Effective or Highly Effective on applicable indicators of the Teacher Evaluation tool within the 5-year project period.

The excerpt below examines the satisfaction with the professional development provided by the grant and the impact on teacher effectiveness.


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Assessing and Planning Change

The Assessing and Planning for Change Diagram serves as both a visual for the components to be considered in a change process and as a quick diagnostic to determine what is missing in your current situation. Knowing this information helps target the areas that need clarification or improvement.


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From Average to Great

A short explanation of the journey that led Tropic Isles Elementary from being a C school to being a Florida Governor’s Sterling Award recipient and a Title I Distinguished School.


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It's Time for Genuine Educational Reform

This article was written for and published by “Catalyst for Change” Journal of the National School Development Council Volume 23, Number 2. Winter, 1994.

Much of what was written in 1994 still holds true. It includes the three E’s and the Chain Reation in Education.


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Leadership Model

Not every conversation is a counseling session. There are many purposes for conversations, such as goal setting, reflecting on progress, attaining compliance with rules or policies, or enforcing consequences. The Leadership Model provides a framework for determining where and how to start a conference or counseling session.


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Graphic Average. Numbers vs. Percentage

As more schools and classrooms are using data, it is important to determine whether a class average, number of students, or percentage provides the best method to accurately reflect progress. Examples are used to illustrate the difference between class average, number reaching mastery, and percentage of students reaching mastery. It will also show the difference between bar and line graphs.


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Three Cautions with Rewarding Student Behavior

Rewards are defined as If, then propositions that are specified BEFORE the behavioral event. This article does not suggest that celebrations or recognition for academic or behavioral progress should not be acknowledged. It identifies three primary things to consider before rewarding.


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THE QUESTIONING PROCESS - CHOICE THEORY
External Evaluation CAN Be Effective

With Dr. Glasser’s emphasis on External Control Psychology vs. Choice Theory®, it seems necessary to distinguish between reasonable external expectations (standards) and external control.


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Using Questions and Data To Develop Problem Solving Skills

Students must be included in their educational plans. Using the Questioning Process allows them to help determine their goals, develop a plan with action steps, analyze their progress, and adjust as necessary. Using the questions in Class Meetings provides students the opportunity to analyze, discuss and solve problems.


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Choice Theory Explains Research Results

Data from the three studies is consistent with Choice Theory ® and Lead Management. All workers have a Quality World Picture of being successful at what they do. The pictures usually include a sense of belonging with other workers; a positive, respectful relationship with the manager; the ability to choose areas in which to continue to build skills; and to enjoy their work. This, of course, translates to a “need satisfying” work experience.


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